December 5, 1776

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General Washington writes to the Board of War not to bring three ranking British prisoners to Trenton for passage to New York, because they would report to William Howe the condition of the American Army.

Washington writes to John Hancock, as well, in regards to his continued concern over General Lee’s failure to join his army with Washington’s:  “Since I had the honor of addressing you Yesterday, I received a Letter from Genl Lee. On the 30th Ulto he was at Peeks Kills, and expected to pass the River with his division two days after. From this intelligence you will readily conclude, that he will not be able to afford us any aid for several days. The report of Genl Sinclair’s having Joined him with Three or four Regiments, I believe to be altogether premature, as he mentions nothing of it. It has arisen, as I am informed, from the return of some of the Jersey & Pensylvania Troops from Ticonderoga, whose time or service is expired. They have reached Pluckemin where I have wrote to have ’em halted and kept together, if they can be prevailed on, till further orders.”

Meanwhile, Charles Lee writes to Washington about, among other things, his concern over his horse:  “I have receiv’d your pressing letter—since which intelligence was sent me that you had quitted Brunswick—so that it is impossible to know where I can join you—but ⟨a⟩ltho I shou’d not be able to join you at all the service which I can render you will I hope be full as efficacious[.] the Northern Army has already advanced nearer Morris Town than I am—I shall put myself at their head tomorrow—We shall upon the whole compose an Army of five thoushand good Troops in spirits—I shoud imagin, Dr General, that it may be of service to communicate this to the Corps immediately under your Command—it may encourage them and startle the Enemy—in fact this confidence must be risen to a prodigious heighth, if They pursue you, with so formidable a Body hanging on their flank, or rear—I shall cloath my People at the expence of the Tories—which has a double good effect—it puts them in spirits and comfort and is a correction of the iniquity of the foes of Liberty.  It is paltry to think of our Personal affairs when the whole is at stake—but I entreat you to order some of your suite to take out of the way of danger my favourite Mare which is at Hunt Wilsons three miles the other side of Princeton.”

Join us at Bow Tie Tours for Philadelphia’s Best Historical Walking Tours.  Our “Independence Tour Extraordinaire” includes tickets to Independence Hall, as well as numerous other sites, such as 2nd National Bank, Graff House, Carpenter Hall, and Christ Church.  If you are interested in learning about George Washington, join us for our Valley Forge Tour.  For Civil War buffs, come see Gettysburg.  Or, for the true history buffs, contact us about taking part in our American History Vacation Packages

 

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December 1, 1776

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George Washington writes to Congress on this day that he did not have the troops to stop the enemy at the Raritan River and had started moving stores toward Philadelphia.

British Corporal Thomas Sullivan heard that General Charles Corwallis’ vanguard had reached New Brunswick and found the bridge destroyed and was unable to follow the “enemy” to Princeton.

Mercy Otis Warren writes to her friend Abigail Adams, voicing the concerns all parents of their time lived with.  “It is A Long time since I had the Happiness of hearing from my Braintree Friends. Dos my dear Mrs. Adams think I am Indebted a Letter. If she dos Let her Recollect A Moment and she will find she is mistaken. Or is she so wholly Engrossed with the Ideas of her own Happiness as to think Little of the absent. Why should I Interrupt for a moment if this is the Case, the Vivacity and Cheerfulness of Portia Encircled by her Children in full health (her kind Companion sharing this felicity,) to Look in upon her Friend in this hour of solitude, my Husband at Boston, my Eldest son abscent, my other four at an Hospital Ill with the small pox, my Father on a bed of pain Verging fast towards the Closing scene, no sisters at hand nor Even a Friend to step in and shorten the tedious hour. I feel with the poet, ’poor is the Friendless Master of a World.’ But before I quit talking of myself I must tell you that the Lovely Image of Hope still spreads her silken Wing, and Resting on her pinion I sooth myself into tranquility and peace amidst this Group of painful Circumstances. A few days will make a very material Change in the feelings of my Heart. It may be filled with the Highest sentiments of Gratitude for the preservation and Recovery of my Children, with their Father siting by my side partaking the Delight. Or! I May—My pen trembles. I have not the Courage to Reverse the scene. I Leave the Theme, When you in unison with my soul shall Have Breathed a sigh that your Friend may be prepared for Every designation of providence.”

Join us at Bow Tie Tours for Philadelphia’s Best Historical Walking Tours.  Our “Independence Tour Extraordinaire” includes tickets to Independence Hall, as well as numerous other sites, such as 2nd National Bank, Graff House, Carpenter Hall, and Christ Church.  If you are interested in learning about George Washington, join us for our Valley Forge Tour.  For Civil War buffs, come see Gettysburg.  Or, for the true history buffs, contact us about taking part in our American History Vacation Packages

 

 

 

Sexual Harassment Allegations Come to Light!

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Betsy Walker has come forth with allegations that Thomas Jefferson, after assuring her husband that he would look in on her while he was away conducting a treaty with a nearby Indian tribe, did sexually harass and attempt to seduce her.  After slipping her an ode to the efficacy of free love, Jefferson was relentless in his attempts.  On one occasion, Jefferson had come to her house to play cards.  After she went to bed he “pretended to be sick, complained of a headache & left the gentlemen…Instead of going to bed….he stole into my room….”  Jefferson was “repulsed with indignation & menaces of alarm and ran off.”

Thomas Jefferson has admitted to the charges Betsy Walker has made, and apologizes for any pain he may have caused.  “I plead guilty…that when young and single I offered love to a handsome lady.  I acknowledge its incorrectness .”   We are still attempting to discover whether or not this was a singular and unique event, although several women (including Sally Hemings, Maria Cosway, Angelica Schuyler, and others) have indicated that this may be a pattern with Mr. Jefferson.

For more stories that would make Matt Lauer blush, join us for one of our evening tours of Sex and the First City.

 

 

November 28, 1776

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John Adams, who has been home at Braintre since October 13th, is summoned to attend the House of Representatives in Boston.

In New York, orders to the American forces to move from there were issued with the march south to begin about 7:00 a.m.  General Charles Cornwallis’ column is reported to be four miles north of Newark and it did enter the city later in the day.

Join us at Bow Tie Tours for Philadelphia’s Best Historical Walking Tours.  Our “Independence Tour Extraordinaire” includes tickets to Independence Hall, as well as numerous other sites, such as 2nd National Bank, Graff House, Carpenter Hall, and Christ Church.  If you are interested in learning about George Washington, join us for our Valley Forge Tour.  For those interested in the Civil War, come see our Gettysburg Tour.  Or, for the true history buffs, contact us about taking part in our American History Vacation Packages.

November 27, 1776

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General Washington writes General Charles Lee in Westchester urging Lee to join him in New Jersey.  “I confess I expected you would have been sooner in motion.  The force here when joined by yours, will not be adequate to any great opposition, at present it is weak, and it has been more owing to the badness of the weather that the enemy’s progress has been checked, than any resistance we could make.  They are now pushing this way.”

Lee, perhaps in a reflection of Washington’s diminished power base after the losses in New York, seems not to feel inclined to follow Washington’s “suggestion” at this point.

Join us at Bow Tie Tours for Philadelphia’s Best Historical Walking Tours.  Our “Independence Tour Extraordinaire” includes tickets to Independence Hall, as well as numerous other sites, such as 2nd National Bank, Graff House, Carpenter Hall, and Christ Church.  If you are interested in learning about George Washington, join us for our Valley Forge Tour.  For those interested in the Civil War, come see our Gettysburg Tour.  Or, for the true history buffs, contact us about taking part in our American History Vacation Packages.

November 25, 1776

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British Colonel Guy Johnson, Indian Superintendent in New York, reports to Lord Germain in England that the Indians have kept their promises to him of last year and that he had sent an officer in disguise to the Six Nations.

In New York, William Franklin writes in a letter to his wife in Perth Amboy, New Jersey, regarding their son going to Paris with his father, Benjamin, “if the old gentleman has taken the boy with him, I hope it is only to put him in some foreign university, which he seemed anxious to do when he spoke to me last about his education.”  William and Benjamin are at odds, since William has chosen to support the British in the conflict.

Join us at Bow Tie Tours for Philadelphia’s Best Historical Walking Tours.  Our “Independence Tour Extraordinaire” includes tickets to Independence Hall, as well as numerous other sites, such as 2nd National Bank, Graff House, Carpenter Hall, and Christ Church.  If you are interested in learning about George Washington, join us for our Valley Forge Tour.  For those interested in the Civil War, come see our Gettysburg Tour.  Or, for the true history buffs, contact us about taking part in our American History Vacation Packages.

November 23, 1776

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George Washington has 5,410 troops with him.  Enlistments for 2,060 will expire on December 1st.  Congress sent Washington a supply of blank commissions to issue at headquarters.  Washington writes the following letter to John Hancock, President of the Congress:  “I have not yet heard that any Provision is making to supply the place of the Troops composing the Flying Camp, whose departure is now at hand. The situation of our Affairs is truly critical & such as requires uncommon exertions on our part. From the movements of the Enemy & the information we have received, they certainly will make a push to possess themselves of this part of the Jersey. In order that you may be fully apprized of our Weakness and of the necessity there is of our obtaining early Succours, I have by the advice of the Genl Officers here, directed Genl Mifflin to wait on you. he is intimately acqu[ainte]d with our circumstances and will represent them better, than my hurried state will allow. I have wrote to Genl Lee to come over with the Continental Regiments immediately under his command; those with Genl Heath, I have ordered to secure the Passes, through the Highlands; I have also wrote to Govr Livingston requesting of him such aid as may be in his power, and would submit it to the consideration of Congress, whether application should not be made for part of the Pensylvania Militia to step forth at this pressing time.

Menawhile, in New York City, British General Orders assign troops for winter residence, order the outlines of old Fort Washington leveled and usable construction materials to be sent to New York.

Join us at Bow Tie Tours for Philadelphia’s Best Historical Walking Tours.  Our “Independence Tour Extraordinaire” includes tickets to Independence Hall, as well as numerous other sites, such as 2nd National Bank, Graff House, Carpenter Hall, and Christ Church.  If you are interested in learning about George Washington, join us for our Valley Forge Tour.  For those interested in the Civil War, come see our Gettysburg Tour and check out our exciting new blog.  Or, for the true history buffs, contact us about taking part in our American History Vacation Packages.