June 28, 1776

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Convicted of mutiny and sedition, Thomas Hickey, former Life Guard to General George Washington, is hanged near Bowery Lane in New York in front of 20,000 spectators.  Washington hoped the punishment would “be a warning to every soldier in the army” to avoid sedition, mutiny, and other crimes “disgraceful to the character of a soldier and pernicious to his country, whose pay he receives and bread he eats.”  He gave an interesting twist to the assassination attempt.  “And in order to avoid those crimes, the most certain method is to kedp out of the temptation of them and particularly to avoid lewd women, who, by the dying confession of this poor criminal, first led him into practices which ended in an untimely and ignominious death.”

In Charleston, South Carolina, at about 10 a.m. Commordore Peter Parker’s squadron opens fire on Fort Sullivan.  To the surprise of the British, the forts palmetto log wall absorbs the British shot, preventing typical splinter injuries to the garrison.  More suprising is the accurate and effective fire directed by Conlen Moultrie at the British fleet.  Their two largest warships HMS Bristol and HMS Thunder suffered extensive damage and severe crew losses.  Commodore Parker suffers painful physical injuries and the embarrassing loss of his breeches.  Moultire’s attack costs Parker 261 injured and dead.  American casualties are slight.

At the Battle of Fort Sullivan Island, American forces commanded by Colonel William Moultrie has a force of 9 ships, he had 64 killed in action, 131 wounded in action  This battle was considered an American victory.

In Philadelphia, Thomas Jefferson presents a draft of the Declaration of Independence to Congress.

Join Bow Tie Tours for the Best Historical Walking Tours in Philadelphia.  On Independence Day, join us for our outstanding 7-hour extravaganza that includes admission to Independence Hall, The Museum of the American Revolution.  End it all at City Tavern for a celebratory drink before the fireworks!

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